Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

(Lucy, our diva, was not available…then again, she did not gorge herself, either.)

Though this is late, with it I send all of my prayers and hopes that you and yours have a wonderful, calm Thanksgiving (and if you’re not in the States, I’m still wishing you a marvellous weekend and all of the joy being thankful gives us!).

Since my running-about-like-a-beheaded-chicken is over with, it seemed like a nice time to share some of the lovely vintage Thanksgiving postcards I’ve run across lately. They’re not only charming, but have such a wonderful personal warmth to them. (Unless you don’t like the idea of turkeys in peril.)

Vintage Thanksgiving Day Postcard

Courtesy Dave, CC BY-ND 2.0

Why did we ever stop sending Thanksgiving cards, anyhow?

Vintage Thanksgiving Postcard

Courtesy Dave, CC BY-ND 2.0

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Mink Hollow Covered Bridge in Arney Run Park, Early Autumn

Covered Bridge, Arney Run Park

That may be my longest post title yet, but that’s barely half the name of of this pretty covered bridge—”The Mink Hollow Covered Bridge in Oil Mill Hollow Over Arney Run Near Borcher’s Mill”! That means this bridge has the longest name of any covered bridge in the nation, something I was unaware of when photographing the structure.

Covered Bridge, Arney Run Park

Built by Jacob Brandt in 1887, the bridge is 51 feet long and stands on its original sandstone abutments. Part of one of Fairfield County’s historic parks, crosses Arney Mill Run in Lancaster; the “Oil Mink Hollow” part comes from the days when a flaxseed-pressing mill stood nearby.

Covered Bridge, Arney Run Park: Bent Nail

The Mink Hollow Covered Bridge et cetera, et cetera, et cetera boasts of not just a long name, but also an unusual structure—if I understand correctly, its central X-brace, combined with multiple Kingpost through truss, are unique to the Buckeye State. This is one of eighteen (or sixteen; there seems to be disagreement) covered bridges in Fairfield County—eighteen remaining of the county’s original two hundred and twenty! Indeed, Fairfield County can still boast of having more covered bridges than any other county in Ohio.

There are reports that the bridge is illuminated at night—I may have to go back for that after a really good snow despite the cold. Wouldn’t those make lovely photos?

Covered Bridge, Arney Run Park

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Monday Escape: Dreamscape

Books and Neon?

 

Lots of books.

A neon sign (in turquoise, no less).

An old building.

Is this the fantasy of quite a few of us or what?

And one wonderful bit of news this Monday: My friend April’s cat is home! A kind couple nearly a mile away spotted him in their yard and returned Silver to his home. Thanks for your prayers…and have a fine Monday.

Riverview Florist, Alone

Riverview Florist. Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

Riverview Florist door. Copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

In a now-quiet Ohio Valley steel town—right around the corner from the famously abandoned car dealership—stands a building so grand for its purpose, it’s difficult to believe it was simply a greenhouse and florist. The English Tudor-style building is so very handsome it seems to have been plucked from one of Britain’s verdant fields and plunked in the centre of fields of concrete instead; that it is flanked by massive, overgrown greenhouses made it an even more outstanding sight.

Riverview Florist. Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

Riverview Florist. Copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

This is not the original Riverview florist and greenhouse headquarters (nor the last); that caught fire in 1935. The Tudor edifice in my photographs was designed by East Liverpool architect Robert Beatty, with the admonition he include pieces of the old greenhouse building—specifically, charred beams rescued from the ashes of the original. These Beatty integrated into the French doors leading to the greenhouses. Presumably, there they remain, future success built, as it nearly always is, on the success of the past.

Riverview Florist. Copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

Riverview Florist. Copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

You’re probably thinking this enterprise must have been at least a little successful for such an impressive structure to serve a florist & greenhouse during the Great Depression, and you’re right. It’s such a marvellous story, too!

Riverview Florist. Copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images.

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Thank You

Thank You

 

Happy Veterans Day to each and every one of you who has served in the uniform of our great nation. What civilians are able to do, every day, in peace and security, rests upon your willingness to sacrifice yourself, your life, your days on the behalf of America.

Thank you, and may God bless you and yours over and above the rest.

And please—whenever you see a veteran, thank them. Genuinely say ‘thank you’, shake their hand. Chat a while if they’re so inclined (though they tend to be industrious folk, so don’t be insulted if they’ve business to attend to!). But always, always say thanks, even if you have to run them down in the supermarket.

They’ve earned it.