Monday Escape: Some days, the sun hits a hood ornament perfectly

"Aspire" hood ornament photo copyright Jen Baker & Liberty Images. All rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

“Aspire”

How was everyone’s weekend? Mine calmed down substantially (whew!) by Friday night, though that hardly means I wasn’t a busy little bee. I’m crossing my fingers for the proper conditions to take a few photographs of the results!

Have a marvellous Monday. You can do it!

 

“The World’s Greatest Air Harbor”: Old Port Columbus Airport

Old Port Columbus Air Terminal & Control Tower Recently the Columbus Landmarks Foundation released their list of the most endangered historic properties in the central Ohio area for 2014. One of my goals is to visit as many of these places as is possible and photograph them as they stand today, so long as they are able to be visited and viewed.

At the very top of this year’s list is the Old Port Columbus Airport terminal on the east side. Opened in 1929, it’s a rather attractive Art Deco building, one hailed as “The World’s Greatest Air Harbor” by the city officials who had spent nearly a decade lobbying for it. None other than Charles Lindbergh himself selected the site for the airport, which also—this is fascinating to me—served as a train terminal for the Transcontinental Air Transport New York to Los Angeles air-rail system.

Old Port Columbus

The “street-side” of the building—this is one of the first things seen by rail passengers entering Port Columbus.

It sounds as if travelling such a distance was a bit convoluted back in ’29: For a $351.94 ticket, you’d go from New York to Columbus via the Pennsylvania Railroad, from Columbus to Waynoka, Oklahoma via air, then back onto a train to head to Clovis, New Mexico, and a final leg in the air from Clovis to LA. I’d probably handcuff my luggage to myself lest it be lost! All of that train- and plane-hopping over the course of the required 48 hours sounds exhausting, but of course it was a much different time—travel was a luxurious pleasure and event back then.

(I’ll pause so we can all lean back and fantasize about romantic railcar trips and airplane stewardesses serving cocktails. Ahhhh…) Continue reading

Monday Escape: Give me some fin

1958 De Soto Firedome

One of the most famed and truly iconic aspects of American cars from the 1950s is the tail fin, a design aspect attributed to the designers’ having returned from war with new, aircraft- and rocket-inspired visions in their minds as well as the nation’s optimism and our preparing to reach the moon (and beyond, it was hoped at the time).

1958 De Soto Firedome
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Monday Escape: Quick! To the garden!

Jefferson's Vegetable Garden. Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

Today I’m (finally) getting my seeds started, which understandably puts me in mind of gardens and their bounty; thus I’ve some garden photos for you to enjoy. Above is, of course, the garden of Thomas Jefferson at Monticello. Now that I’ve a nice wide-angle lens, it seems to me I must get back to photograph Jefferson’s home and gardens again. Darn!

"White on Blue" garden photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

"Nestled" peace rose photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

My much-missed “Peace” rose at our former home. None of the nurseries here carry nice-enough-to-buy specimens. Alas!

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Visiting the octagon vintage filling station in Delaware, Ohio

Delaware's Octagon Filling Station photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

We’re standing at the corner of Lake & Central in Delaware, Ohio.

Delaware's Octagon Filling Station photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

Tired of the snow, you say? I suppose you could check this older view of the station. But time marches on, does it not?

Delaware's Octagon Filling Station photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

I’m sorry—and can completely understand, especially as the stuff was until this morning in today’s forecast—but thought you might forgive seeing the last scraps of it. (Hey, at least the first photo involves no snow whatsoever.)

Delaware's Octagon Filling Station photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

Somehow, these photos of Delaware, Ohio’s octagonal filling station got lost in the shuffle, so we’ll have to put up with the snow—but I think you’ll like them anyhow. Continue reading

WWII Aircraft at the National Museum of the US Air Force

Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pins to this page are okay. "B-17: Shoo Shoo SHOO, Baby!"

The Museum’s B-17: “Shoo Shoo SHOO, Baby!”

As promised, today we get to head back to the Air Force Museum in Dayton! Last week we looked at early aircraft and WWI planes; today I have planes from the second major conflict of the 20th century to share with you. Just as with my earlier post, if you’d like to learn more about a specific plane, just click on the photo; it’ll take you to the photo’s page on Flickr, where more often than not I’ve included information about each ship.

P-47D "Five By Five" photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

The P-47D “Five By Five”, one of my favourites—not least because of the song, but this Thunderbolt is good-looking, too.

Perhaps our only disappointment was one ship we missed: The world-famous Memphis Belle—the real thing, not an imitation, as anything you’ve seen at an airshow is very much not the real Memphis Belle—is at the Museum, being lovingly restored by the Air Force. She can only be viewed on Fridays, however, and you must register in order to visit. I hope to be able to do this soon (Hubby just needs to get a Friday off)! There are many imitation and mock-up Memphis Belles out there, but the real deal is right here in Ohio, after spending decades sitting in Tennessee. There’s a very good article about the Memphis Belle and the ongoing, years-long restoration (with some good photos) here.

Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay. "The Forgotten Ship"

The Bockscar: The Forgotten Ship

Do not let that lead you to believe there are no historically astounding aircraft more easily accessed at the Museum, however. Continue reading

Monday Escape: Cozy Cabin

Sugarshack at the Arboretum. Photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.Despite the fact that central Ohio is supposedly in line for another bout of ugly wintry weather this week, I really won’t be able to get away with sharing snowy photos like this one with you for much longer, will I? Not only is spring nearing, I suspect most of us are thoroughly sick and tired of winter, this one in particular. Even so, this log cabin is so winsome—it seemed the perfect cure for a Monday (the Monday after Daylight Savings Time, no less).

The "Sugarshack" at Dawes photo copyright Jen Baker/Liberty Images; all rights reserved. Pinning to this page is okay.

You’ve probably already guessed that this cabin stands at the aforementioned Dawes Arboretum, and you are correct. The Dawes family built this cabin, for use as a summertime retreat, during the 1920s, using hand-hewn logs as well as beams from a barn built in the 1800s already on the property. Personally speaking, I thought the chimney was just beautiful—it almost seems to have an Arts & Crafts influence (I’m probably wrong).  Continue reading